Jun 132013

As Winter and Spring blossom into Summer, Iron View Inspections infuses new life into our Good Will Offers  as gratitude for our working relationships with clients and Realtors.  We’ve replaced our 10 % off discount with a more valuable service for all our clients and referring Realtors. As of June 1st we now perform ReCallChek and  include 90 Day Warranties at no extra charge for all full home inspections (specialty services and inspections: asbestos, mold, radon sampling and ozone treatments are exempt due to lab fees). We include Thermal Imaging for all full home inspections at no extra charge as well.

Paying It Forward

~ Continuing In the Spirit of Giving to all our referring Agents and Clients who cultivate our Growth~

*** New Agents – 1st Referred Pre-Delivery, Pre-Lisiting, Pre-Purchase or Maintenance Inspection booked will receive 1/2 OFF ***
*** All clients – Receive Thermal Imaging + ReCallChek + 90 Day Warranty with full Home Inspections – Free***
*** All Agents – For every 10 clients referred and booked the 11th inspection is free. ***

Along with the ReCallChek service, Clients will receive a monthly ReCallTrak e-newsletter informing them of important home ownership tips and allowing clients to update new  and smaller appliances for safety checks at no extra charge.

All Realtors benefit from Free ReCall Trak e-newsletters e-mailed monthly to the realtor and their clients through Iron View. The bonus is your ability to set up marketing for your business at no charge, at the top of the newsletter. Iron View will contact you on how to do this to increase your exposure.

 We will be updating our site soon to allow you easy access to RecallChek and 90 Day Warranty Info. www.ivinspect.com.  Call Iron View Inspections for more INFO. 1-888-449-4324  to  be able to offer these services  without inspection, for your friends and families at a minimal fee.

Wishing All  A Gloriously Colourful and Safe Summer.

The Iron View Team
Jim, Nelson, Cathy
May 052013

Spring came late to the GTA and with it came unusually humid weather following an unusually moist and precipitous winter. Along with this weather and influx of home sales, already reaching multiple bid proportions, came the unusually high call for Air Quality, Asbestos and Mold Inspections. Home sellers and buyers inspectors were making note of  particular concern in basements, walls and attics alerting realtors and clients to costly remediation. Better to catch the issue with sampling and testing, before an Inspector does, during a Pre-purchase buyers condition. The dealings get tricky as to who pays for what and some in order to save a few dollars will compromise due dilligence,  sometimes costing more in the long run.

Some buyers inspectors  note possible mold or asbestos but they do not perform testing. Iron View Inspections has recently been called in to perform a second  inspection  for mold or asbestos. We have had  verbal reports from clients and realtors that the first visual inspection indicated possible mold or asbestos. Some inspectors have made a claim that there is a definite presence so clients have called in remediation. We at Iron View recommend testing before any definitive conclusions or costly remediation or renovations be performed.

If a seller suspects mold or asbestos it is recommended they have Pre-listing  inspection and testing performed before a prospective buyer has their inspector detect possible mold or asbestos, putting into motion delays in the selling process and possibly reaching costly and unnecessary conclusions for remediation and replacement of structural areas in the home. The last few weeks of April and May  have drawn our attention to  the importance of doing things correctly so all parties have Peace of Mind and deals are made in ethical fashion with out compromise.

We have worked with very understanding realtors, sellers and buyers wanting to be educated about the need for proper testing and identification and possible abatement and remediation that may be required. We have also encountered some clients and realtors willing  to compromise proper testing to save a few  dollars and still others who jump to demands for remediation and abatement without having all the necessary information to make informed decisions.  In the scheme of things spending early on  in the buying/selling process for proper identification  by testing methods is worth the minimal expense to do things correctly.

Iron View  Mold and Asbestos Inspections include a full home inspection that involves testing via; A. air sampling (taking 2-3 air tests) and B. lift or bulk sampling. Once the samples make it to an independent lab the real testing begins.

Mold or Spore Trap Analysis  testing results indicate airborne spores that are present per m3 and identify what types of mold are airborne in the living environment. Be aware that mold is every where and is present in all environments. The levels of spores present  in air are indicators of problems or not. But the air samples do not indicate whether the mold is active or not. The lift sample results come from a Direct Microscopic Exam and determine the types of mold present that are active or not and  cause for concern for future mold growth and whether the mold contains types of spores that are considered a risk for health issues.

Asbestos  air sample  testing results indicate particles or fibers that are presently airborne in the living environment and are measured by their Level of Quantification (LOQ) via visually estimating asbestos/non-asbestos fibers under a microscope as well as identifying non-fibrous materials and other building material particles that may be present. Lift or bulk samples of building materials like insulation, pipe wrap or tiles etc. are also tested under a microscope to determine the Level of Dispersion (LOD)  using a staining method.

Any client or realtor who is asking for only one of the above tests, to save costs, is compromising testing and conclusive results. Anyone recommending abatement  or remediation without proper testing and results may also be compromising and possibly costing the buyer or seller more than  necessary.

Be Aware that mold and asbestos cannot be properly identified by visual inspection. An inspector who is making a definitive claim visually, without proper testing or recommending proper testing, is doing an injustice to all involved. Iron View has encountered blackened attic sheathing, once tested proved not to be mold at all but did prove to be  a discolouration due to aging.  Had the buyer followed the claims made by the first inspector with out testing, huge expenses to replace roofing would have been incurred.  Iron View has encountered situations where a white film of insulation dust on sheathing has been misidentified as mold or asbestos. Iron View has also encountered situations where the mold is not easily identified visually because it is so deep in the material the material is rotting from the inside out, usually called dry rot or the area is so wet mold cannot be determined without a test and the entire attic needs remediation and  the roof replaced. In the case of Asbestos. A home owner had grave concern learning that the insulation put into his home before he purchased it  a year prior, was possibly Asbestos. He learned that the previous owner was in a court battle due to an inspector that definitively claimed it was asbestos insulation without proper testing. Iron View tested the material and air with results showing the material had no asbestos fibers present. If an inspector is noting in reports that there is possible mold or asbestos and recommends further investigation, he/she has done due diligence … You’ve got a good one.

Iron View Inspections can offer one better… we can also send in some samples for  independent lab testing at the same time as  performing a regular Pre-Delivery, Pre-Listing, Pre-Purchase or Maintenance Inspection.

~Be As Informed As You Can Be~

 

 

 

 

 

Nov 012012

October 2012 has been one of the coldest and rainiest since our move to the GTA three years ago.  We learned all about Hurricane Hazel this past weekend as the media recounted that 1950’s storm, while reporting that Hurricane Sandy blew torrential winds and rain through the GTA.  Power for thousands was cut as fallen trees, hydro lines and minimal flooding wreaked destruction on many homes and properties. The storm also took 2 lives in the GTA due to flying debris. Our hearts go out to all who have suffered.

As an Inspection company Iron View seeks positive ways to get around the limitations imposed by weather conditions or lack of access in order to offer the most thorough observations for our clients. Such conditions can occur at any time hindering safe access for observation reporting, even when there is no destructive storm.

We recently inspected a tiny 40+ aged bungalow in the centre of Toronto on a Monday in mid- October of this year. It was well before Hurricane Sandy whirled through. There had been a steady light rain with fog and drizzle causing high humidity ranging from 88% to 98% a few days prior to as well as on the day of Inspection. The saturation of the structure and surrounding landscape presented safety issues for setting ladders and walking roofs. However the wet conditions afforded positive benefits for the inspector when checking for leaks and humidity issues, of which he found none in the home on that day. The home was dry and cozy.

Our Inspector did note to the seller who was present during the Pre-Listing service being performed, that the roof was very old and probably in need of replacement soon. The seller agreed. The Inspector noted this information on the report and specified there was a missing shingle that should be attended soon to deter rotting of the sheathing. The inspector asked where the attic hatch might be since he had not observed one during the inspection. He wanted to see if there was any leaking present or signs of rot on the roof sheathing beneath the shingles. There was no access to the attic available.

Although the slope and pitch of the roof did not pose a problem for the Inspector to walk it; the age, slippery condition, loose shingles and potential to cause damage to the roof and injury to him cautioned him to safe practice. He opted to climb his ladder in the drizzle only to the roof edge, used his high powered binoculars and photographed the missing shingle which was easily visible from the ground without visual aids. He also did a moisture check on the interior ceiling area near where the shingle was missing. He found no signs of deterioration on the ceiling and no moisture registered in that area of the ceiling.

After the observations were made and the inspector consulted with the seller concerning his findings, the seller admitted knowing about the missing shingle for quite a while adding plans to have it repaired before listing the home. The seller also mentioned during the review of findings, that the neighbours were going to have their roof replaced in a few weeks. The seller was going to ask those roofers to look at the loose and missing shingles. The seller also informed the inspector that the siding was new because the insurance company would not insure the home when it was bought since it was originally covered by asbestos shingles. The inspector informed the seller that this information could not be documented in his report since he did not observe the asbestos shingles  under the siding nor could he report what the seller was intending to do with roof repairs. Rather our inspector suggested the seller have their Realtor disclose that information to prospective buyers.

The home was listed with an open house viewing just 5 days following the inspection. Rain and wind continued throughout that week and weekend. The seller made copies and sent e-mails for prospective buyers during the open house. The seller told the inspector during a follow up call  that the Open House was a success with 5 offers being made. The house was sold within ten days. Then…the seller’s satisfied tone changed admonishing our inspector;

”The roofers replacing the neighbours roof told us that you missed the hole in my roof where the missing shingle was and insulation was sticking out of that hole. This could have been a deal breaker.”

Our Inspector reminder the seller about the consultation they had on the day of inspection when the seller informed him about knowing about the missing shingle for quite some time before the inspection took place. He reminded the seller that the roof was inaccessible for safe observation on the day of inspection and that he noted those findings in the report along with up close and very clear photos showing no signs of a hole or insulation protruding where the shingle was missing on the day of inspection. He had done his due diligence within the parameters of safety with regard to weather conditions and lack of access. Then he asked;

“Did you disclose this information and your intentions for repair to the buyer?”

 The seller thanked the inspector for his report and hung up. We encourage all parties, sellers, buyers, realtors and inspectors to due diligence. Ask as many questions of the realtors and inspectors that you can, keep a record of the answers and educate yourselves to the limitations that conditions affecting safety dictates.  Although limitations present challenges they also present opportunity to find positive solutions. Iron View Inspections is dedicated to taking a Solid Look for clients and backing it with Honesty, Openness and Willing to report findings as thoroughly as possible.

~Be As Informed As You Can Be~

Dec 302010

Have you ever heard a Realty agent ranting about the problems caused by an inspectors report which lead to stressed negotiations about repair agreements? We have more than once.

There are some Inspectors that go to the extreme, just as there are relators and home buyers who support extremes. There are home inspectors with engineering designation who miss visible issues that can be detrimental to your financial investment. It is safe to say that no one position offers a guarantee that a home will be worry free.

Good inspectors don’t make or break the deal. They don’t even get involved in the deal. They simply report, inform what they do see and what they do not see and why they cannot see?

We recently encountered a situation where one inspector told a prospective buyer that there might be mould in the attic but a mould inspection was not necessary.  This inspector may have been a little extreme in his caution. The prospective buyer and his realtor suggested that the sellers put on a new roof with new insulation then they would finalize the deal at the seller’s price. Of course you can imagine that the sellers would not consider the offer even if they were getting their asking price.  They had lived in the home for half a decade without issue. For their peace of mind, they instead called for a mould inspection from Iron View Inspections who sent the test samples to an independent lab. They learned there was not a moisture problem in the attic which would promote mould growth. They also learned that the mould spore count that might be present on materials and in the air was no more harmful than the mould we breathe daily indoors at work or carry into our home on our shoes and pet hair from outdoors. Their home sold to another buyer at their asking price a week later. They moved on with peace in the knowledge from that minimal cost to have a Pre-sale and mould inspection, that they were not living in a home with mould issues or selling a home with issues that might come back to haunt them after selling.

Another situation that we encountered not long ago was an agent representing the prospective buyer during the inspection. The agent, not even a third of the way through reading the report, anxiously accused our inspector of being too thorough and therefore heading toward killing the deal he had worked so hard to put together. Our inspector took extra time to meet with the prospective buyer to explain the reasons for listing all maintenance issues, explaining the minimal cost to get his maximum return on the investment. The prospective buyer was very grateful and became an owner, for the first time, of an investment property and has called our inspector back to report on his next investment.

A reasonable buying agent will inform a prospective buyer that a good inspector will include on inspection reports advisories at specific points of reference so that monitoring of given systems or the possibility of a future issue can be dealt with successfully and at minimal cost. All buildings have systems with their own unique issues that will need maintenance down the road. A good inspector will report such items on his report.

It is very crucial to remember that clients make a decision to buy a home or property because they like it. Once the offer is made they want to take a cautionary attitude and be sure that their investment is worthy. An inspector is hired to find issues the client or the realtor may not be able to discover on their own.Many sellers are now considering Pre-sale inspections to inform themselves of issues that may be present in their homes that might deter quick sale.

~Be As Informed As You Can Be~

Let us know what you think.

Jan 282010

Pre-listing home inspections give both the buyer and seller up-front knowledge of potential repair costs.

Inventories in most parts of the country have been pushing historically high levels. Gone are the days of multiple offers, and buyers camping out and entering lotteries to make a home purchase. With the shifting market, buyers are increasingly more sensitive to property conditions and are more than ever asking for full disclosure, up front, about condition and other factors that affect the value.

A pre-inspected listing makes available, to the buyer, a full inspection report by a qualified home inspector. The report informs the buyer on the condition of the property, that is to be considered. The buyer becomes aware of what potential expenses might be incurred once they close on the property. The buyer can decide early during negotiation if they want to pursue a property, given the condition. There may be some excepted items they can live with, but others they cannot.

The same report can and could be used by the sellers to assist them in preparing property disclosure documents. It allows the seller to anticipate any objections directed toward property structure and system functions, such as heating and air conditioning – objections that may have potential financial implications.

A pre-listing inspection can be available at the property for review by the buyers after viewing the property. The listing agent could also have the inspection report available for prospective buyers and their agents through an HTML link on their website.

While a pre-listing inspection will not head off every potential “deal-breaker” issue, most agree the benefits outweigh holding off on the inspection, until after contract acceptance. Here are some benefits to conducting the inspection prior to the listing.

  • Identify defects and make repairs ahead of time. By identifying possible defects early on, the seller is in a position to handle repairs prior to listing, making the listing more attractive and the property more saleable. This may mean a quicker and more financially lucrative sale. Making repairs ahead of time will limit objections over defects during the negotiations. If the seller elects not to repair certain defects that turn up in the inspection, they can disclose the defects to potential buyers in the disclosure documents. State  and Provincial disclosure laws vary. It is highly recommended that sellers consult with their attorneys on disclosure laws.
  • Aid as a pricing tool. Having a completed inspection report from a certified inspector will help you (the seller) arrive at a realistic list price. If you find out, for example, that your HVAC system shows significant wear and tear and will need to be replaced before the next winter season, you should take that into consideration when pricing your home for sale.
  • Provide a feeling of confidence to potential buyers. With a clean inspection in hand after viewing a property, potential buyers may feel more comfortable in moving ahead with an offer. When a buyer can see there are no major defects in the property to be addressed, it is easier for them to determine how much they can comfortably spend on the house. If there is a problem that needs to be addressed, the buyers can write an offer that will reflect the cost of the needed repairs, or they can ask the sellers to remedy the defect.

Best practices in today’s buyers’ markets dictate one of the best things sellers can do, to facilitate a sale, is to conduct a pre-listing property inspection, by a certified inspector.  Have it readily available for potential buyers. The more information offered to the buyer, the better the negotiations which will hopefully result in a successful contract.

Contact us Today to have your property inspected prior to listing with a Realtor.

Copyright © 2011. All Rights Reserved. Testimonials | Privacy Policy A division of The Bodnarchuk Group Inc.